Plantar fasciitis means inflammation of your plantar fascia Your plantar fascia is a physically powerful band of tissue like a muscle that stretches from your heel to your focus foot bones. It supports the arch of your foot and too acts as a shock absorber in your foot. Plantar fasciitis is common. About 1 in 10 people will find plantar fasciitis at some time in their life. It is the majority common in people between the ages of 40 to 60 years. However, it can happen at any age. It is twice as frequent in women as men. It is too common in athletes.

You should also be doing gentle calf stretching exercises. This will reduce stress on the plantar fascia in two ways. The first manner in which a relaxation of the tension in the calf muscles can help heel pain is that it will reduce the direct pull backwards on the heel bone (calcaneus). The second reason is a little bit more complicated, but essentially it is that a tight achilles tendon and calf muscles causes the rearfoot to move in a manner that causes over pronation as your leg and body move forward over your foot. To strengthen the muscles in your arch toe curls or "doming" can be done.

Normally the Plantar Fascia is very tough and flexible to withstand forces transmitted during walking or running. The normal function can be however affected by excessive abuse of the feet, over-pronation, old age or being over-weight. As a result of the painful stretching the Plantar Fascia exhibits micro-tearing that leads to irritation, inflammation and pain at the junction of the Plantar Fascia and calcaneus or heel bone. The continued pulling of the Fascia joined to the heel bone can result in a bony growth on the heel commonly known as a Heel Spur. This growth triggers pain in the surrounding tissues that get inflamed.

Plantar fasciosis is a foot condition characterized by heel pain and pain in your plantar fascia—a strong and dense connective tissue structure on the sole of your foot that supports your foot arch. This condition has historically been called plantar fasciitis because it was believed that plantar fascia inflammation was the principle underlying cause. Plantar fasciosis is a more accurate name for this condition because it involves degeneration—microtears, cell death—of your plantar fascia, not inflammation. See YouTube Video - Plantar Fasciitis or Fasciosis? Active men between the ages of 40 and 70 are most commonly affected by this health problem.

The plantar fascia is located on the underside of your foot. It is a connective tissue that runs along the arch of the foot from the heel to the bones on the ball of the foot. The plantar fascia stabilizes your toes and absorbs shock for your legs. The American Council on Exercise states that impact activities such as running, aerobics and plyometrics can irritate and inflame the plantar fascia. Plantar fasciitis is associated with pain originating at the heel and running the length of the bottom of the foot. Pain is usually most prevalent in the morning when you wake up and begin walking. plantar fasciitis surgery

Originally is was assumed that Plantar Fasciitis was just an inflammatory condition, however inflammation is only rarely the cause. Individuals with flat feet/no arches or very high arches are more prone to plantar fasciitis than individuals with normal arches. Other causes or risk factors for plantar fasciitis are sudden weight gain or obesity, long distance running, and poor arch support in shoes. I have extremely flat and pronated feet, had gained weight rapidly during each of my pregnancies and also didn’t get orthotic inserts regularly, choosing rather to try and extend the life of old supports.

Stretching the calf muscles is an important part to reducing plantar fascia tension. The calf muscles, including the gastroc and soleus, attach to the back of the heel. Tension from these muscles pulls back on the heel, causing tension on the plantar fascia. A great way to stretch the calf the first thing in the morning, before you take your first steps, is to hook a towel on the ball of your foot and while keeping the knee straight pull back on the towel. Hold the stretch for a minimum of 30 seconds and repeat a few times.

Other effective techniques include use of a slant board ( Figure 3 ) or placing a two-inch × four-inch piece of wood ( Figure 4 ) in areas where the patient stands for a prolonged time (e.g., workplaces, kitchen or stoves) to use in stretching the calf. Dynamic stretches such as rolling the foot arch over a 15-oz size can or a tennis ball are also useful ( Figure 5 ) Cross-friction massage above the plantar fascia ( Figure 6 ) and towel stretching ( Figure 7 ) may be done before getting out of bed and serve to stretch the plantar fascia.

Shoe modifications are also important. Wearing the proper shoe and in some cases in combination with a custom orthotics helps to cushion and support the foot and keep the plantar fascia supported to stop excessive strain on the foot. Custom orthotic devices are custom molded to your foot and prevent any biomechanical defects with your foot to help aid in recovery and prevent future recurrences. Night splints are also used at night to keep the plantar fascia stretched to reduce morning pain associated with this condition. Injection therapy can be combined with the above modalities.

Two reasons for sore feet would be the corns and calluses which have grown due to unnecessary rubbing of the feet on the footwear material. Dead skin cells accumulate and in the end form these types of unpleasant corns and calluses. Shoes that are fashioned with rough fabric and materials could possibly be bothersome if you don't dress yourself in stockings in order to decrease the friction points. You can remove the calluses and corns many times with the aid of over-the-counter medications or even by utilizing an exfoliating agent in conjunction with bathing them in warm water.plantar fasciitis exercises

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